How Aaron trained his brain

Aaron has been diagnosed with dyslexia, dyspraxia, Asperger's syndrome and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder…

When I spoke to 12-year-old Aaron Randall recently, he'd had a good day at school.

That's a small miracle, given that Aaron has been diagnosed with dyslexia, dyspraxia, Asperger's syndrome and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder… "Just about everything, all rolled into one boy," he told me.

Until recently, going to school was an ordeal: "Every day I wanted to die because I was bullied and picked on."

His teachers told his mother, Marie, that her son was lazy, aggressive and an uncontrollable nuisance.

Today, Aaron not only enjoys his new school, St John Vianney in Blackpool, but his grades in English, maths and science have also gone from a level 2 to level 5 in just three months.

Emotionally, too, his life has been transformed. "My son has friends now, which is a huge step," says Marie. "Recently he made me a cup of coffee, sat down beside me and told me he loved me. There were tears in my eyes."

According to Marie, this remarkable change is down to the Dore programme, a brain-training system put together by Welsh entrepreneur Wynford Dore, who invested millions of pounds investigating a way to help his own dyslexic daughter (Susie had become so frustrated and depressed that she tried to kill herself).

The drug-free, noninvasive approach aims to correct cerebellar developmental delay (CDD), believed to be the root cause of learning difficulties. It's thought that, for some reason, the neural pathways connecting the cerebellum (which integrates data from our senses so we can learn efficiently) to the cerebrum (or 'thinking brain') are not fully developed. The result is that information isn't processed quickly or efficiently.

The Dore programme uses simple repetitive exercises to stimulate the cerebellum and create new neural pathways; this helps learning, language, emotions and coordination.

Source - Daily Mail

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