Could probiotics ward off cancer?

A growing body of scientific evidence points to the role intestinal bacteria plays in triggering and preventing obesity, and other chronic diseases. Now, a new study suggests that it could also help reduce the risk for certain types of cancer.

The findings show that certain bacteria in the gut has anti-inflammatory properties that help slow or stop the development of the disease. Ultimately, it could mean doctors are able to reduce a person's risk of cancer by analyzing the levels and types of bacteria in their gut.

From there, they could then prescribe probiotics to replace or bolster the amount of bacteria with anti-inflammatory properties, said the study's senior author, Professor Robert Schiestl from the University of California, Los Angeles.
'It's not invasive and rather easy to do,' he said. 

Over millions of years, gut bacteria have evolved into both good and bad types.
The good ones have anti-inflammatory properties and the bad ones promote inflammation. The human body typically contains about 10 trillion bacterial cells, compared with only one trillion human cells.

Source  - Daily Mail