High fibre diet 'can cut risk of developing breast cancer'

Young girls and women who eat diets high in fibre cut the risk of developing breast cancer, a new study has found.
Researchers at Harvard found that those who who ate more fibre in early adulthood, particularly from fruits and vegetables, were 16 per cent less likely to get breast cancer overall. This figure rose to 24 per cent in breast cancer before the menopause.
Every additional 10 grams of fibre that women ate each day during early adulthood cut the risk by 13 per cent, according to the study.  This amounts to around one apple and two slices of whole wheat bread, or half a cup of kidney beans and cauliflower or squash, according to the study published in the journal ‘Pediatrics’.
Breast cancer is the most common form of the disease among women, according to the World Health Organisation. The latest worldwide figures from 2011 show that over half a million women died of the disease that year.