Fish diet could ward off depression

Eating a lot of fish may help protect against depression, research suggests.
An analysis of 26 studies of more than 150,000 people in total indicated a 17% reduction in the risk of depression among those eating the most fish. One potential reason given by the researchers was the fatty acids found in fish may be important in various aspects of brain activity.
Mind, the mental health charity, said the study supported other work showing links between diet and mood.
Writing in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, the Chinese researchers said many studies had been done looking at fish consumption and depression, but the results had been mixed. When they looked at different study types, they found that the apparent protective effect of eating lots of fish was specific to studies done in Europe and not those from other areas of the world.
To try to come to a conclusion on what they said had been a controversial issue, they collated the data from all the relevant studies they could find conducted since 2001. Their calculation did show a significant link between the two, and it was true for men and women.