Alternative health: acupuncture

The successful, driven individuals who tend to come through Gerad Kite's Harley Street doors know why they are there. Or at least they think they do. “There is normally one thing that gets them here,” the 52-year-old five-element acupuncturist says with a smile. “They say, 'I’ve got backache,’ or, 'I can’t get pregnant,’ or, 'I feel depressed.’ There is a wide variety of reasons.”
But what concerns Kite, who uses the most traditional form of acupuncture, one that predates the discipline’s 20th-century Traditional Chinese Medicine incarnation by a couple of millennia, is not the symptom but the cause. “Five-element puts you back in touch with that part of yourself that lives intuitively as opposed to in a predetermined way.”
Kite argues that the way we live is making us ill. “If you want to let your life unfold in the best possible way, you need to accept that you are not in control. When people are well they live instinctively, they are not consciously engaged with everything they do.” Five-element draws on Taoist philosophy. “We are brought up to think 'yourself’ is the sum of your thoughts. But in the five-element world, your thoughts are one thing, who you are is something else. The goal is to become more aware of your true self.”