Hooked on fish-oil pills? You're wasting your money

Britain has fallen out of love with vitamin supplements — just 35 per cent of us regularly take them, down from 41 per cent in 2008.  Yet fish oil sales seem to be holding their ground. But we’re wrong to place so much faith in them, says TOM SANDERS, professor of nutrition and dietetics at King’s College, London.
Fish-oil supplements are now so popular that as many as one in five people take them regularly, according to the latest National Diet and Nutrition Survey.
You can see why, with claims that the pills can prevent a multitude of disorders, from Alzheimer’s to Zellweger syndrome, a rare hereditary disorder.  However, the idea that a single dietary component taken in such small doses should have such widespread effects is, in my opinion, laughable.  Rather than a passport to good health, fish-oil pills are more like snake oil.
I’ve been researching the health benefits of fish and fish-oil supplements, which contain long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, for more than 30 years.  What I have found is that, although fish-oil supplements have a role to play for some people, they have been over-hyped and over-sold. Although they won’t actually harm you in the vast majority of cases (though if you eat too many you’ll get fat), there is little evidence of any health benefit.

Source  - Daily Mail