Do coffee drinkers die young or live long?

Every day Britons drink 70 million cups of coffee – roughly two each per adult. Many get caught in the sugar, nicotine, caffeine trap, thinking this combination is good for energy. But this combination feeds increasing fatigue, anxiety and weight gain. In my own research we surveyed over 55,000 people and found that the two foods that most predict fatigue and stress are caffeinated drinks and sugary foods, both addictive substances.  Many people become hooked on caffeine and sugar to keep going, gaining weight and losing health as a result. 
But what are the long-term consequences? Do coffee drinkers live longer or die young?
A study following the fate of almost 400,000 people has found that, overall, coffee drinkers are more likely to die younger.  But is that a result of the coffee or associated habits? When the researchers adjusted for smoking, the risk of death actually reversed. Coffee drinkers tended to have a slightly lower risk of death, although the decreased risk didn’t consistently become greater the more coffee was drunk. Slightly less risk were observed for deaths due to heart disease, respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes, and infections, but not for deaths due to cancer.

Source  - Patrick Holford